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Friday, July 21, 2017

Verizon admits to throttling video in apparent violation of net neutrality - The Verge

Verizon admits to throttling video in apparent violation of net neutrality - The Verge: "Yesterday, we reported that Verizon Wireless appeared to be throttling Netflix traffic, — and today, the company seems to have come clean. In a statement provided to Ars Technica and The Verge, Verizon implicitly admitted to capping the traffic, blaming the issue on a temporary video optimization test.

 “We've been doing network testing over the past few days to optimize the performance of video applications on our network," a Verizon Wireless spokesperson said. “The testing should be completed shortly. The customer video experience was not affected.”" 'via Blog this'

Friday, July 07, 2017

UK mobile carrier copies T-Mobile's Binge On scheme, nearly down to the name - The Verge

UK mobile carrier copies T-Mobile's Binge On scheme, nearly down to the name - The Verge: "A spokesperson from Three responded to The Verge about whether the new policy violates EU net neutrality and its competitiveness guideline:

 “No, we are compliant with regulation. Neither the EU net neutrality regulations nor the Berec guidelines prohibit the zero rating of services. Go Binge does not block content and it does not prioritise or restrict traffic. We are promoting customer choice: customers can opt out of the service if they choose to do so. We are not compelling consumers to participate and we are not charging them anything if they do so. This is an innovative product which adds to a number of zero-rated agreements in place across the industry.”

Virgin Mobile launched a similar program last year in which it zero-rates Facebook apps, like WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger." 'via Blog this'

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Twitter Joins Net Neutrality Protest | Multichannel

Twitter Joins Net Neutrality Protest | Multichannel: "Fight for the Future pointed Thursday to a Morning Consult/Politico poll finding a majority of respondents support prohibiting blocking and throttling and paid prioritization.
ISPs have long said they can live with no blocking or throttling, though they are somewhat less emphatic about no prioritizing. What they say they can't live with, or certainly don't want to, is what they argue are Title II regs meant for last-century telephone service applied to this century broadband." 'via Blog this'

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Brazilians Rebel Against Data Caps. The Rest of the World Should, Too. - Morning Consult

Brazilians Rebel Against Data Caps. The Rest of the World Should, Too. - Morning Consult: "The economic structure of this market suggests ISPs may be implementing data caps all over the world. It’s not surprising to learn that almost 2 million Brazilians signed a petition against data caps in 2016, and that 600,000 said “yes,” in an online poll conducted by the Senate, to a bill that creates a new right of “internet access without data caps.” Consumers know that data caps are not for their benefit, and that the technical arguments sustained by the ISPs are flawed.

 The Brazilian Congress is about to change the famous “Marco Civil da Internet” — a federal law that became known as the “Constitution for the use of Internet” — in order to establish a new right: the right to connect at home without data caps imposed by ISPs. This could be a new type of “digital right” for the 21st century." 'via Blog this'

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Finnish mobile operators ask to opt out of free EU-roaming rules due to #netneutrality Yle Uutiset | yle.fi

Finnish mobile network operators ask to opt out of free EU-roaming rules | Yle Uutiset | yle.fi: "Finnish operators say there are far more mobile customers from Finland who travel around Europe and use the internet - as opposed to the other way around - making it a lopsided deal.

Another hurdle facing local operators is that subscribers in Finland are used to having unlimited, uncapped data, while operators in many other countries charge customers based on how much data is actually used, down to the megabyte.

Having access to unlimited data, subscribers from Finland have become accustomed to using a lot of it." 'via Blog this'

Wednesday, June 07, 2017

Everyone Should Be Getting Wikipedia for Free - Reason.com

Everyone Should Be Getting Wikipedia for Free - Reason.com: "The lack of clarity about zero-rating could change overnight, however, and it wouldn't require any new laws, any new regulations, any new quasi-formal inquiries from the commissioners—or even Pai's proposed rollback of the 2015 regulatory order. All it would take would be for Pai to call openly (in speeches or interviews, say, or other public appearances) and frequently for internet providers to experiment with adding zero-rated public information to their offerings." 'via Blog this'

Net neutrality: Amazon among top internet firms planning day of action: Guardian

Net neutrality: Amazon among top internet firms planning day of action | Technology | The Guardian: "Amazon, Etsy, Kickstarter, Mozilla and Vimeo all intend to hold a day of protest on 12 July in opposition to plans by Donald Trump’s newly appointed telecoms regulator to neuter tough 2015 rules meant to protect “net neutrality” – the concept that all traffic should be equal online." 'via Blog this'