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Thursday, February 08, 2018

Activists Plan 'Operation: One More Vote' to Save Net Neutrality

Activists Plan 'Operation: One More Vote' to Save Net Neutrality: "Several internet rights groups are planning to push lawmakers into becoming the final vote needed in the Senate to support a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution that would ignite an attempt to save net neutrality.

 Last month lawmakers said they needed just one more Republican vote in the Senate in order to have the votes needed to pass a CRA resolution that would overturn the Federal Communication Commission‘s (FCC) decision to rescind net neutrality rules, which ensured that internet service providers (ISPs) treat all internet traffic equally.

If the Senate is successful, a similar bill would need to pass through the House of Representatives before reaching President Donald Trump‘s desk to sign into law." ENDS! 'via Blog this'

California Senate defies FCC, approves net neutrality law | Ars Technica

California Senate defies FCC, approves net neutrality law | Ars Technica: "ISPs would be forbidden from using deceptive or misleading marketing practices "that misrepresent the treatment of Internet traffic or content to its customers."

Violations would be punishable under the state's existing consumer protection laws, which allow for injunctions and financial damages.

The California bill would also prohibit state agencies from buying Internet service from an ISP "unless that provider certifies, under penalty of perjury, that it will not engage in" the activities banned by the bill.

 The Montana and New York executive orders focus exclusively on the purchasing requirements for state agencies instead of imposing requirements directly on ISPs. The California bill is a more direct challenge to the FCC's preemption order because it requires all ISPs to follow net neutrality rules regardless of whether they provide Internet service to state agencies." 'via Blog this'

Net neutrality fight returns to D.C. - The Boston Globe

Net neutrality fight returns to D.C. - The Boston Globe: "Now, Democrats hope to turn this into an important election-year issue.

Senator Ed Markey is gathering votes for a Senate bill that would overturn the FCC decision. Think of it as a reversal of a reversal. Markey can’t file the bill until the ruling is listed in the Federal Register, something that’s expected any day now.

Markey has all 49 Democrats on board, and one Republican (Susan Collins of Maine). He needs one more colleague." 'via Blog this'

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

MEPs urge US to halt net neutrality repeal - Mobile World Live

MEPs urge US to halt net neutrality repeal - Mobile World Live: "MEP Marietje Schaake, who is also VP of the European Transatlantic Legislative Dialogue, called the move to revoke the policy a “historic mistake”, adding: “Internet and the flow of data does not stop at the border and the FCC’s decision has a global impact. A reversal of net neutrality rules by the United States is a threat to the open, free and fair internet.”

“The European Parliament has been a vocal proponent of net neutrality rules within Europe. Today we undertake action to also preserve the open internet in the US.”" 'via Blog this'

CMA provisionally finds Fox/Sky deal not in the public interest - GOV.UK

CMA provisionally finds Fox/Sky deal not in the public interest - GOV.UK: "Fox announced on 14 December 2017 it had agreed the sale to Disney of certain assets including its interests in Sky. It also announced it was continuing its proposed acquisition of the shares in Sky it does not own. Should both acquisitions be completed successfully Disney would assume full ownership of Sky, including Sky News.

The sale to Disney will itself be subject to regulatory scrutiny and it is unlikely to be completed until after the CMA inquiry has concluded. It is therefore uncertain whether, when or how that transaction will be completed. As such, the CMA’s analysis of the Fox/Sky transaction cannot take it into account in its assessment of the transaction but implications of the Disney transaction in relation to remedies is considered in the notice of possible remedies." 'via Blog this'

Monday, January 22, 2018

Wetmachine » Tales of the Sausage Factory » The History of Net Neutrality In 13 Years of Tales of the Sausage Factory (with a few additions). Part I

Wetmachine » Tales of the Sausage Factory » The History of Net Neutrality In 13 Years of Tales of the Sausage Factory (with a few additions). Part I: "As I record in my first “Net Neutrality Primer” from 2006 , the FCC under Republican Chairman Michael Powell classified cable modem as an “information service.”

As the FCC Order described, this eliminated the mandatory rules governing Title II telecommunications services that governed things like phone lines and DSL lines. Importantly, however, the FCC did not relinquish authority and oversight over broadband (indeed, they called the accusation they were abandoning all oversight of broadband “fear mongering”).

This is rather important for those who keep asking the question “why do we need net neutrality now when everything was fine before 2015?” As demonstrated with links by this little walk down memory lane, until December 14 2017, we always had rules to prevent the companies that owned the lines from blocking, degrading or otherwise interfering with the broadband traffic. The idea that we needed entirely separate rules to prevent this behavior didn’t even become a thing until after the Cable Modem Declaratory Ruling." 'via Blog this'

Monday, January 15, 2018

States Push Back After Net Neutrality Repeal - The New York Times

States Push Back After Net Neutrality Repeal - The New York Times: " lawsuits against the commission are expected shortly after the policy becomes official. Last week, a lobbying group for big technology companies including Facebook, Google and Netflix announced that it planned to join the lawsuits, giving the opposition substantial new resources. More than a dozen state attorneys general have also announced plans to sue the commission.

 But state lawmakers say they cannot wait around to see what happens with those efforts.

State Representative Norma Smith, a Republican who introduced the other bill in Washington, said net neutrality was an important safeguard for small businesses that might not be able to pay internet service companies for fast speeds. Even though Republicans in Washington, D.C., supported the repeal, she said many Republicans in her state supported her bill." 'via Blog this'